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Best tools for washing cars?

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Best tools for washing cars?

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Old 11/1/06, 02:23 PM
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Best tools for washing cars?

I've heard not to use micro-fiber cloths or wash mits because the piles are too short and tend to attract dust at the surface, causing scratches.

I've used a synthetic wool wash mit which seems to work OK but has started to put fine scratches in dark paint surfaces.

I've used a chenille mop for the roof of my cargo van (I use a 1 story step ladder + extension handle and the detailing mop) with great results.

What are your expert opinions on using a chenille wash mit or wash pad for the rest of the car body? the piles seem long enough to hold dirt deeper in the pad, and are easy enough to use. I may just buy new pads every year, along with new microfiber towels and applicators.

I've used NuFinish in the past, but have recently found out about Klasse and won't ever go back to NuFinish. I use Klasse AIO first, followed by 2-5 layers of the Klasse Glaze on top surfaces.
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Old 11/5/06, 03:49 AM
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There are short-nap microfiber mitts, but they're not ideal for washing -- however they do have their purpose here and there, such as for dusting the interior and whatnot.

No matter the material, one needs to wash and inspect their wash mitt regularly, and replace it about once a season. I often rotate my old wash mitts for use on wheels, tires and lower (dirtier) areas before eventually tossing them.

My preference is for a plush genuine sheepskin wash mitt (meaning on the hide), but you can also get very nice lambswool wash mitt (a genuine wool, but woven onto a cloth backing -- S.M. Arnold sells one at OSH and other stores). A plush cotton chenille is pretty nice, too, but I consider them a step down from sheepskin and they come in varying qualities, so don't go cheap. There are also chenille-like microfiber mitts but I have not tried them.

Aside from changing the wash mitt, it sounds like you may be picking up debris, so try switching to a two-bucket method while washing... have one bucket with suds and another bucket with rinse water to rinse the mitt of any debris before dipping back into the suds.

Rinse with a gentle low-pressure stream to help "sheet" the water off the vehicle so there's less to dry.

Be sure you're using quality waffle-weave microfiber drying towels -- get one or two drying towels, and some wheel & jamb towels and you'd be all set. I've got quite a few different waffle-weave towels, and probably my favorite is soft foam-core waffle weave drying towel that Mothers sells online... you can just lay it down and "pat" dry. The smaller towels are handy for nooks and crannies.

A plush detailing towel with some instant detailer is nice for drips and touch-ups as you finish up.

Wash your mitts and towels separately from linting fabrics every time you use them in a gentle machine cycle with liquid detergent -- and without chlorine bleach or fabric softeners. Wash microfibers separately from other linting fabrics. Tumble dry gentle, low heat, and without using drying sheets. I usually wash my wash mitt with cotton towels or jeans or something else to make a full load. A visual and hand inspection of the towels is done on a clean counter as I fold them -- they are scratch-free, but can pick up debris that can scratch your paint.
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Old 11/5/06, 11:38 AM
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I'm going to give the Grit Guard a try. I have heard lots of positive reviews for this insert and it makes sense.
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Old 11/22/06, 06:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Jim D. View Post
There are short-nap microfiber mitts, but they're not ideal for washing -- however they do have their purpose here and there, such as for dusting the interior and whatnot.

No matter the material, one needs to wash and inspect their wash mitt regularly, and replace it about once a season. I often rotate my old wash mitts for use on wheels, tires and lower (dirtier) areas before eventually tossing them.

My preference is for a plush genuine sheepskin wash mitt (meaning on the hide), but you can also get very nice lambswool wash mitt (a genuine wool, but woven onto a cloth backing -- S.M. Arnold sells one at OSH and other stores). A plush cotton chenille is pretty nice, too, but I consider them a step down from sheepskin and they come in varying qualities, so don't go cheap. There are also chenille-like microfiber mitts but I have not tried them.

Aside from changing the wash mitt, it sounds like you may be picking up debris, so try switching to a two-bucket method while washing... have one bucket with suds and another bucket with rinse water to rinse the mitt of any debris before dipping back into the suds.

Rinse with a gentle low-pressure stream to help "sheet" the water off the vehicle so there's less to dry.

Be sure you're using quality waffle-weave microfiber drying towels -- get one or two drying towels, and some wheel & jamb towels and you'd be all set. I've got quite a few different waffle-weave towels, and probably my favorite is soft foam-core waffle weave drying towel that Mothers sells online... you can just lay it down and "pat" dry. The smaller towels are handy for nooks and crannies.

A plush detailing towel with some instant detailer is nice for drips and touch-ups as you finish up.

Wash your mitts and towels separately from linting fabrics every time you use them in a gentle machine cycle with liquid detergent -- and without chlorine bleach or fabric softeners. Wash microfibers separately from other linting fabrics. Tumble dry gentle, low heat, and without using drying sheets. I usually wash my wash mitt with cotton towels or jeans or something else to make a full load. A visual and hand inspection of the towels is done on a clean counter as I fold them -- they are scratch-free, but can pick up debris that can scratch your paint.

Excellent post!!

I get my mit/towels from here. Seem to be a good price after shopping around, and good quality.
http://www.prestostore.com/cgi-bin/s...ef=exceldetail

Use the menu on the left side to shop.
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Old 11/26/06, 07:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Jim D. View Post
There are short-nap microfiber mitts, but they're not ideal for washing -- however they do have their purpose here and there, such as for dusting the interior and whatnot.

No matter the material, one needs to wash and inspect their wash mitt regularly, and replace it about once a season. I often rotate my old wash mitts for use on wheels, tires and lower (dirtier) areas before eventually tossing them.

My preference is for a plush genuine sheepskin wash mitt (meaning on the hide), but you can also get very nice lambswool wash mitt (a genuine wool, but woven onto a cloth backing -- S.M. Arnold sells one at OSH and other stores). A plush cotton chenille is pretty nice, too, but I consider them a step down from sheepskin and they come in varying qualities, so don't go cheap. There are also chenille-like microfiber mitts but I have not tried them.

Aside from changing the wash mitt, it sounds like you may be picking up debris, so try switching to a two-bucket method while washing... have one bucket with suds and another bucket with rinse water to rinse the mitt of any debris before dipping back into the suds.

Rinse with a gentle low-pressure stream to help "sheet" the water off the vehicle so there's less to dry.

Be sure you're using quality waffle-weave microfiber drying towels -- get one or two drying towels, and some wheel & jamb towels and you'd be all set. I've got quite a few different waffle-weave towels, and probably my favorite is soft foam-core waffle weave drying towel that Mothers sells online... you can just lay it down and "pat" dry. The smaller towels are handy for nooks and crannies.

A plush detailing towel with some instant detailer is nice for drips and touch-ups as you finish up.

Wash your mitts and towels separately from linting fabrics every time you use them in a gentle machine cycle with liquid detergent -- and without chlorine bleach or fabric softeners. Wash microfibers separately from other linting fabrics. Tumble dry gentle, low heat, and without using drying sheets. I usually wash my wash mitt with cotton towels or jeans or something else to make a full load. A visual and hand inspection of the towels is done on a clean counter as I fold them -- they are scratch-free, but can pick up debris that can scratch your paint.
ditto
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